Category Archives: Previous Articles

Edible Gardens, Lewis Carroll and the Swinging Sixties – August 2011 – pg2

A Mad Hatter Scarecrow

Alongside the 12 show gardens, 11 small gardens, 4 show features, 9 ‘InSpring’ spaces and 9 Conceptual Gardens, the RHS sponsored 6 Poet Gardens inspired by English poems and accompanied by readings of their works. The ‘Grow Your Own’ marquee was 1125 m2 , equivalent to four tennis courts. The floral marquee stand was 6750 […]

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Edible Gardens, Lewis Carroll and the Swinging Sixties – August 2011

The Loris Hospice garden of light and reflection

THIS IS the twenty-second year of the Hampton Court Palace Flower Show, held in 34 acres of the Palace grounds and organised by the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). As might be expected with such an extensive show, it takes 11 months to prepare and three weeks to set up each show garden which must be […]

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Honey from Hive to Jar: Part 3 – August 2011 – Pg4

A 60 W tubular heater (seen some action!) and thermostat

There are other legal requirements for the wording that appears on labels. The Internet is a good source for up to date information, eg, www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/ pdfs/honeyguidance.pdf

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Honey from Hive to Jar: Part 3 – August 2011 – Pg3

Most British honey granulates in storage so for final filtration before bottling it has to be liquefied, ie, heated until it becomes clear honey. This requires a temperature of 35–40 °C but, as I said in Part 1 of the series, this needs to be done extremely carefully to avoid damage to the honey.

Most British honey granulates in storage so for final filtration before bottling it has to be liquefied, ie, heated until it becomes clear honey. This requires a temperature of 35–40 °C but, as I said in Part 1 of the series, this needs to be done extremely carefully to avoid damage to the honey.

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Honey from Hive to Jar: Part 3 – August 2011 – pg2

A homemade cappings draining device

Tangential extractors are usually cheaper and more compact (easier to store when not in use) but extract fewer frames (2 or 4) at a time. The frames also have to be reversed at least twice during extraction, so the whole process of extraction is slower.

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Honey from Hive to Jar: Part 3 – August 2011

A plastic cold extraction tray plus the tools for the job

A FINAL warning before extraction – do not extract honey from frames unless you are sure the water content is sufficiently low. It is possible to dry honey further whilst it is still in the comb but virtually impossible to do anything after it has been extracted (see Part 2, July, page 16). Capped honey […]

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Running a Beginners’ Beekeeping Course – August 2011

Gail Orr (front row, centre) with his class of beginner beekeepers

IN 2009, Rostrevor and Warrenpoint Beekeepers, the newest association in Northern Ireland, which meets in the foothills of the Mourne Mountains in County Down, had formed an ambitious plan to run a beginners’ course. They needed a tutor and somehow I got myself talked into taking on the role.  

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Advances in Honey Bee Nutrition – August 2011 – Pg2

A range of different pollens

Pollen is needed for certain age-related duties of adult worker bees. It is sometimes termed ‘nature’s perfect food’. In bees, it aids the development of body tissue, muscles and glands, particularly the hypopharyngeal or brood food glands.  

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Advances in Honey Bee Nutrition – August 2011

Your bees may be well fed but have they had the right nutrition

ADVANCES IN honey bee nutrition can sometimes be thought of as comparing fat bees with skinny bees. Nectar collected by bees provides carbohydrate for their energy requirements, pollen provides for their protein, minerals, fats and vitamins for their body-building needs and water enables bees to assist in temperature control, particularly when the weather is hot, […]

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The Facts About Feeding – August 2011 – pg4

A pollen trap and some of the pollen it has collected

It will be necessary to make your own communal water feeder and instructions can be found in some beekeeping text books and on the Internet  

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